William Peacock (b. 1987) grew up in French Camp, Mississippi. His exposure to music mostly came from the school and church choirs he belonged to and performed in. While attending Belhaven University, he became fond of music theory, then music composition, finishing his Bachelor's of the Arts in Music Composition under the tutelage of Dr. Andrew Mark Sauerwein. He is currently finishing his Master's in Music Composition under professors Dr. Frank Felice and Dr. Michael Schelle at Butler University.

I Corinthians 13:12 (OEB) – As we yet see, in a mirror, dimly, but then – face to face! As yet my knowledge is incomplete, but then I will know in full, as I have been fully known.

"In making music compositions, I seek to commune with God and explore all that is good, true, and beautiful, imitating our Creator in this specific creative act. My scores invite performers and audiences into this communion; at times in thoughtful contemplation, at other times in intense engagement, for the beautification and sanctification of myself, performers, and audiences in making the music in community together."

Inquiries, comments, commissions, and the like, should be directed to:

wpeacock@butler.edu

Compositions

To the Church in Japan

PDF score

To the Church in Japan is based on the following verses from the New Testament of the Holy Bible:

Revelations 2:17 (OEB) – Let those who have ears hear what the Spirit is saying to the churches. To those who conquer – to them I will give a share of the mystic manna, and I will give them a white stone; and on the stone will be inscribed a new name, which no one knows except the person who receives it.

I Corinthians 13:12 (OEB) – As we yet see, in a mirror, dimly, but then – face to face! As yet my knowledge is incomplete, but then I will know in full, as I have been fully known.

The music plays with a sense of recognizability, at first being indistinct and remote, then gradually becoming more tangible and recognizable, then moving again into the opening indistinctiveness. Two melodies are used, and both are relatively familiar, but they have had their appearances altered to point to a third, mysterious identity, our common Creator, the one behind all that is good, true, and beautiful in the world.

Further Information:

To the Church in JapanTo the Church in Japan takes it’s name from both the letters that, recorded in Revelations, John sent from Christ Jesus to several churches in existence at the time, and from the use of the “Sakura Sakura” melody. It, along with the melody from “Be Thou My Vision,” are the borrowed melodies that make up the piece, most notably pages 4 and 5, where each is quoted in full. In order to create a sense of both recognizability and unrecognizability, I have preserved the shapes and certain important phrase points for each melody, but I have used some Messiaen-like techniques to bend intervals (i.e., descending by major 6th rather than by major 6rd) as one bends light through a prism, breaking their original modes and avoiding being in any one mode. In order to respect the “Sakura Sakura” melody’s kumoijoshi scale, and to distinguish it further from the “Be Thou My Vision” melody, I have used chromatic mirrors to emphasize the character of the half-step relationships from the original mode.


We Shall Have Spring Again


PDF score

We Shall Have Spring Again is a mixture of music and sound-world, depicting the great lion Aslan's return to Narnia bringing a swift end to the White Witch's eternal Winter and the joy that results from the return of Spring. I was enthralled by Lewis's fantasies as a child, and, when I return to them as an adult, I find myself thinking more about how they touch on reality. It is my hope that this music may be heard in both senses.

Further Information:

This piece was commissioned by the Butler Community Arts School, receiving its world premier on April 8th, 2017 at Butler ArtsFest. This piece was difficult to write, logistically speaking. The music needed to be able to be performed by an inexact number of student percussionists, some of which had limited experience and skill, and I wanted to give those students something more interesting to do than "shake this thing when someone points at you." The music, therefore, contains elements suitable for both new students (graphic notation, simple rhythms, etc.) and more experienced students or their instructors (rhythmic displacement, bowed vibraphone, etc.). The scoring, with its variable number of performers and the option of doubling instruments, is set up to allow performances by both large and small percussion ensembles.

To obtain the parts for performance, please email the composer - wpeacock@butler.edu


To Be Whole (a gift for Sarah)


PDF score

This piece concerns one's inner parts, competing desires, being in disagreement, and what it would look like for those inner parts to begin working together.

Further Information:

This is my first lengthy composition, born partly out of my experience in counseling, and composed for my then fiance, now wife. This piece takes advantage of modality, starting in one mode, breaking into two modes, then four modes, then rejoining into two modes based on the same final. The restless cadences are the result of the fracturing modes whose members resist forming traditional harmonic cadences with one another. The final note, a leading D♯ in the first violin, is borrowed from its neighbor's mode, pointing to a wellness and completion not yet come but hoped for.