Joseph Bohigian


Photo by Raffi Paul

Joseph Bohigian is a composer and performer whose cross-cultural experience as an Armenian-American is a defining message in his music. His work explores the expression of exile, cultural reunification, and identity maintenance in diaspora. Joseph’s works have been heard at the Oregon Bach Festival, June in Buffalo, Walt Disney Concert Hall, New Music on the Point Festival, TENOR Conference (Melbourne), and Aram Khachaturian Museum Hall performed by the Mivos Quartet, Decibel New Music, Great Noise Ensemble, Argus Quartet, Fresno Summer Orchestra Academy, and members of Yarn/Wire and featured on NPR’s Here and Now and The California Report. He is also a founding member of Ensemble Decipher, a group dedicated to the performance of live electronic music. Bohigian is currently a doctoral candidate at Stony Brook University and has studied at California State University Fresno and in Yerevan, Armenia with Artur Avanesov.

Compositions

The Water Has Found its Crack
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The Water Has Found its Crack
performed by Catherine Sandstet, Heidi Schneider, Alina Tamborini, Rob Cosgrove, Kate Dreyfuss, Sophia Sun, and Tsung-Yu Tsai

The title is a reference to an anecdote shared by Turkish-Armenian journalist Hrant Dink about a French-Armenian woman who died while visiting the village of her youth in Turkey. When the question of where she should be buried arose, a man from the village responded “Let her be buried here...the water has found its crack.” It is a story of Armenians longing to be reunited with their indigenous land, not to take it but, in Dink’s words, “to come and be buried under it.”
Stone Dreams
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Stone Dreams
performed by Ensemble Decipher

“Aylis is grey this time of year. Grey-colored mountains… Frozen stones, streets, houses hardly breathe in the cold awaiting the coming of spring. The Stone Church.”
“What was the reason, my God, that in Aylis, long-forgotten by you, your hills and your stones had come alive again?”