Performance at the 2016 LaTex Festival at the University of Texas.

Jacob Thiede is a composer, saxophonist and current PhD student at the University of North Texas. Recently, his music has been championed by the Red Clay Saxophone Quartet, the 15.19 Ensemble, STACKS Duo, and pianist Kris Carlisle. He received his BME at Murray State University and MM in music composition at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He has studied with Mike D'Ambrosio, Brian Ciach, and John Fannin at Murray State and with Mark Engebretson, Alejandro Rutty, and Steven Bryant at UNCG. As a saxophonist, he has studied with Scott Erickson and Steven Stusek. Current interests are grooves and rhythms in metal music, glitch, and the manipulation of sine tones. Jake studies composition with Kirsten Broberg and Andrew May as well as saxophone with Eric Nestler at the University of North Texas.

Compositions

And everything in-between


PDF score

And everything in-between began as an attempt to reflect the “different types of infinities” into a musical form. Originally, this was done by thinking that the beginning and end of the piece represent 0 and 1, respectively. By composing “everything in-between,” the music (or “real numbers”) between this 0 and 1 became my infinite array of possibilities. As the piece unfolded, I was compelled to write music that reflected a through composed form. Much like a real number continually changes by adding more values after the decimal point (0.1, 0.11, 0.111, 0.1111, 0.11111, etc.), I wanted to change the value of my music by keeping the same reference point (tempo or “decimal”) but changing the rhythmic values (half notes to triplet-sixteenth notes or “one tenth” to “one hundred thousandth”). Ultimately, I would be influenced by Desiigner’s “Panda” to create a fast-paced ending to conclude a simple piece of music with an overly thought-out design.


When all else fails (take your time)



When all else fails (take your time) is part of a series of musics for tuba and computer that involve the exploration of groove, sine tones, and rhythmic “rides.” The music was written during a time in my life I was impatient. Unfortunately, I’m still impatient. Writing this work has been beneficial for me—to remind myself to hold life with an open hand and enjoy the subtleties of each day. Commissioned and premiered by Matt Hightower for the 2017 South Central Tuba Euphonium Conference at University of Texas at Rio Grande Valley during the weekend of March 17th through the 19th.